Word and Music – taking it forward

It is a long time since I blogged here and I was inspired to have another go after seeing my former minister Michael Quicke a week so ago. Michael was the person who started me on my Christian music and worship journey.  He gave me the opportunity to play the organ at my home church in Blackburn when I was only a teenager. He gave me a job as music director at St Andrew’s Street Baptist in Cambridge when I was only 18. He set me on a course to understand that excellence in music in worship was a great thing, that music and indeed worship as a whole should reflect above all the glory and majesty and beauty of God.  He was and is an amazing preacher and communicator, and lover of all that is best in music.

Those were the days when I practised hymns on the organ over and over to get the speed just right, tried to illustrate the words with differing registrations for each verse, collected last verse harmonisations to provide a thrilling conclusion to the great hymns of praise, wrote trumpet descants for my friend Jackie to play.   I used also to choose organ voluntaries for after the service that were (for the most part) loud and triumphant – to send people out confidently to “live and work for His praise and glory.”

Those services of worship were ones where preaching and worship went hand in hand.

As an aside, even now as well as still loving great hymns and organ pieces, I get most excited at church in worship when we sing joyful gospel music, or loud songs of praise, or beautiful quiet songs, and struggle most to engage during times of “intimate” worship or response times when the focus seems to be all about me and how I feel about God, how I am going to respond, how He might want to fix things that are wrong with me, and less about who God is.   Rather than build confidence and faith in God, for me these times seem to undermine that.  I am not saying they are wrong, but I certainly struggle hugely with them.  Am I the only one?

The last time I blogged, it was about my Bach studies and how Bach’s music, particularly, is a medium for letting the Word of Christ dwell richly in us.

 

Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly, teaching and admonishing one another in all wisdom, singing psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, with thankfulness in your hearts to God. (Colossians 3:16 ESV)

The other passage that has been of great significance to me over the past 20 years is Psalm 40.

He put a new song in my mouth,
    a song of praise to our God.
Many will see and fear,
    and put their trust in the Lord. (Psalm 40:3 ESV)

Here the Psalmist talks about music as a medium for proclaiming the works of the Lord, above all proclaiming the salvation of God and the truth of the gospel.

So I am taking up the computerised pen again, and will use this blog to keep exploring how music can best proclaim the truth of God and help his Word well in us as richly as possible.

I want to try and look at this from an historical and contemporary perspective.  No doubt Bach will feature, but I want to see how other composers over the centuries approached this task, or failed in it.  I hope that regular blogging will gradually cause some key ideas to surface which may point to how, in our day, our worship can enable the Word of Christ to dwell in us as richly as possible.

I hope that if these ideas interest you, you will respond, comment, point me to different avenues of exploration. I am excited about how music, actually ALL music, can point to God and how all theology can and should elicit deeper worship.

 

 

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3 thoughts on “Word and Music – taking it forward

  1. I will be interested to follow your blog – as a preacher and minister of a church I struggle with church music, hymns and songs. Struggle not so much with choosing or having to craft a service but with the strong held beliefs by those who either feel its got to be all new and contemporary and those who feel it must be hymns with doctrinal content. Maybe I’ve had to deal with one too many ‘worship war’ conversations but its left me with a sense of loss whenever we sings anything as all I can hear are the comments that have either been said or will be said soon after the service. Whatever the case I often use “secular” music for my own quiet times and can hear God in the lyrics of songs which I am certain were never penned with God in mind. One of the songs that plays in the background of my study is “Abwoon” by Lisa Gerrard, the Lord’s prayer sung in Arabic – simple, beautiful and inspiring – which is surely what we aim for when we gather for worship and incorporate music and words. To look and listen for the fingerprint of The Holy Spirit in all the arts is helpful – after all we are created in His image to create and be creative.

    • Thanks for your comments. I can certainly sympathise with this. I love your thought about looking and listening for the fingerprint of the Holy Spirit in all the arts as helpful. I am enjoying reading Pictures at a Theological Exhibition by Kevin Vanhoozer at the moment (the chapter I am in is about Goodness, Truth and Beauty), and have found the writings of Marva Dawn helpful too…

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